Rivers Of Ethiopia

Ethiopia is often referred to as the “water tower” of eastern Africa because of the many rivers that pour off its high tableland.A visit to this part of Ethiopia offers the visitor a true safari experience. Some of the major rivers of Ethiopia are listed below.

The Blue Nile

Blue Nile makes about 80% by volume of the Great Nile River. The Blue Nile from Ethiopia originating form Lake Tana and the White Nile that originated form Lake Victoria merge into the Great Nile River at Khartoum, the Sudan capital to form the longest river of the world draining to the Mediterranean Sea.

The Blue Nile Falls is one of the most popular tourist destination sites along the historic route. The Blue Nile Falls is situated near Tis-Abay town, 30 kms to the east of Bahir Dar, which is 20-30 minutes walk from the little town of Tiss Abey.

The Omo River

tribes-of-omo-valleyThe Omo River tumbles its 350 -kilometer way through a steep inaccessible valley before slowing its pace as it nears the lowlands and then meanders through flat, semi-desert bush eventually running into Lake Turkana. Since 1973, the river has proved a major attraction for white-water rafters. The river passes varied scenery, including an open gallery forest of tamarinds and figs, alive with colobus monkeys. Under the canopy along the riverbanks may be seen many colorful birds. Goliath herons, blue breasted kingfishers, white-cheeked turacos, emerald-spotted wood doves and red-fronted bee-eaters are all rewarding sights while monitor lizards may glimpse scuttling into the undergrowth. Beyond the forest, hippos graze on the savannah slopes against the mountain walls, and waterbuck, bushbuck and Abyssinian ground hornbills are sometimes to be seen.

 

The Baro River

baro-riverThe Baro River area, accessibly by land or air through the western Ethiopia town of Gambela, remains a place of adventure and challenge.

 

 

 

 

Awash River

awash-riverThe great Awash River which rises in the high lands west of Addis Ababa curves round south of the city .By the time it gets to it is broad flow of muddy waterfall in to a 100 meters deep canyon its way to extinction in the low land of the Danakil Depression. It never reaches to the sea.

 

 

 

Rafting

raftingRafting can be organized on Omo, Awash and Baro Rivers, experienced and professional local rafters with best equipments can be arranged on request.

The Baro River area, accessible by land or air through the western Ethiopian town of Gambela, remains a place of adventure and challenge. The Omo River tumbles its 350-kilometers way through a steep inaccessible valley before slowing its pace as it nears the lowlands and then meanders through flat, semi-desert bush eventually running into Lake Turkana. Since 1973, the river has proved a major attraction for white-water rafters. The season for rafting is between September and October, when the river is still high.